Harvard University ‘s library materials are disintegrating. That’s true of materials in all the research libraries in the U.S.–and the world, for that matter. But Harvard’s librarians, as one example, have been diligently undertaking a preservation project to digitize these materials before they’re gone altogether. Additionally, they’re making some of these digital libraries accessible by the public for free in their Open Collections Program. One such collection to take note of is the READING Harvard Views Of Readers, Readership and Reading History.

Reading: Harvard Views of Readers, Readership, and Reading History is an online exploration of the intellectual, cultural, and political history of reading as reflected in the historical holdings of the Harvard Libraries. For Internet users worldwide, Reading provides unparalleled digital access to a significant selection of unique source materials:

  • personally annotated books owned by John Keats, Herman Melville, Hester Lynch Piozzi, and others
  • William Wordsworth’s private library catalog
  • commonplace books used by Joseph Conrad, Washington Irving, Victor Hugo, and more
  • records of the Harvard College Library that reveal the reading activities of Emerson, Longfellow, and Thoreau
  • historical textbooks that document the principles, and some of the biases, in reading instruction from the 18th to the early 20th centuries
  • more than 250,000 pages from 1,200 individual items from the Harvard collections, including 800 books and 400 manuscript selections

For researchers, teachers, and students who may not have ready access to extensive historical collections, Reading provides an inspired opportunity to participate more fully in this rapidly expanding research area.

“The Connecticut News Project, Inc. is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit news organization created to reinvigorate coverage of Connecticut’s state government, public policy and politics. Our primary goal is to ensure that the people of the state are better informed about their government and its activities, so they can more effectively participate in the development of public policy and hold officials accountable for understanding and addressing the state’s needs. We will achieve this goal through original and reliable reporting presented on our website, and distributed through various other platforms and technologies. We will report, analyze, explain, and investigate the activities of state government, reasserting the “watchdog” role of the media. CNP also intends to encourage and facilitate discussion and debate on public policy matters, to create an archive of documents and data about state government and to help train a new generation of journalists.”

http://www.ctmirror.org/news

Systematically and mercilessly disassembling, flushing, greasing, and re-packing the cycling culture. That’s the BikeSnobNYC’s mantra. If you’re serious about riding, you’re probably already familiar with the blog. But wait–there’s a BikeSnob book coming out in May from Chronicle Books:

“Cycling is exploding in a good way. Urbanites everywhere, from ironic hipsters to earth-conscious commuters, are taking to the bike like aquatic mammals to water. BikeSnobNYC cycling’s most prolific, well-known, hilarious, and anonymous blogger brings a fresh and humorous perspective to the most important vehicle to hit personal transportation since the horse. Bike Snob treats readers to a laugh-out-loud rant and rave about the world of bikes and their riders, and offers a unique look at the ins and outs of cycling, from its history and hallmarks to its wide range of bizarre practitioners. Throughout, the author lampoons the missteps, pretensions, and absurdities of bike culture while maintaining a contagious enthusiasm for cycling itself. Bike Snob is an essential volume for anyone who knows, is, or wants to become a cyclist.”

If you’re a woman and you love to ski, you’ve come to the right place! You’ll find ski news, a directory of women’s ski resources, and a forum where you can chat about anything that has to do with skiing — gear, technique, resorts, and more — in a way that you can relate to.

Wendy Clinch, who founded and runs the website is also the author of Double Black, a mystery that takes place on the slopes of Vermont which is garnering positive reviews. The book will be released in January.

Arts & Letters Daily

November 29, 2009

We know that for some of you sitting down to enjoy a few hours with the Sunday Times is a–if not the, highlight of your week. Bravo, we say. But do you know about Arts & Letters Daily? Let us warn you that it may become an addiction…there are far worse things. A service of the Chronicle Of Higher Education, this site is an aggregation of articles from newspapers, magazines, book reviews and selected columnists with a focus on philosophy, aesthetics, literature, language, ideas, criticism, culture, history, music, art, trends, breakthroughs, disputes and gossip. The next time you have say, 7 0r 8 hours to spare, take a look at this site. Bet you can’t read just one article.

http://www.aldaily.com/

Read Books Online For Free

November 14, 2009

If you’re looking for things to read online, you’ve hit the jackpot. Below is a link to the Sharing Learning blog which has a post on 20 free online libraries and reading rooms. These links are to literature that’s out of copyright protection as well as to current literature, books and academic journals that can be accessed because of the authors’ belief in free and open access to information.

http://myeslcorner.blogspot.com/2009/11/20-free-online-libraries-and-reading.html

Free e-Book Classics

November 12, 2009

planetebookThere are a variety of free e-Book websites that allow you to download e-Books to your computer or read them online. Some sites give readers access to older books which have aged out of their copyright protection and some offer brand new material from authors who are trying to promote their work in this format. Planet eBook declares themselves “the home of free classic literature.”  They offer just over 60 literary classics which can be downloaded to your computer, free and legal. Works by authors such as Charles Dickens, Jules Verne, Oscar Wilde, Bram Stoker and Leo Tolstoy can be enjoyed and shared with your friends or classmates. Planet eBooks also provides a suggestion box for classics you would like them to offer.

http://www.planetebook.com/